Diesel men are like connoisseurs of old hams or juleps

This story from the Washington Star Newspaper from May 18, 1942, brought back a lot of memories for me. The first part certainly takes me back to all of the training I received as a young man in the Navy.                                  Over the course of my career, I attended over 60 Navy schools related to […]

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I don’t need communications lessons… everyone always understands everything I say

I have been teaching leadership classes for at least 35 years. That includes formal and informal classes in the Navy and in the civilian community. Whether it was for a large or small companies, the importance of purposefully developing skills and competencies has always been one of my passions. Leadership involves more than just telling […]

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Need to improve? You need PDCA

The name of the blog is theleansubmariner. While much of my writing is based on submarines and their history, every once in a while, I fall back on my other passion which is the “lean” part of the title. Lean is a process that leads to the elimination of waste (among other outcomes), but it […]

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1930 – the last chance to eliminate the rattlesnakes of the seas is over

The London Naval Conference of 1930 This conference was the third in a series of conferences meant to slow, limit or eliminate large combat shipbuilding efforts among a group of nations that were seen as potential adversaries. From the State Department’s Historian: “The purpose of the meetings was to promote disarmament in the wake of […]

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1928-1929 “Air getting very bad. Please hurry,” and finally, “Is there any hope?”

1928 1929 1928 continued to show challenges for the American submarine fleet. The characteristics of the submersibles of the S class were that they had to spend much of the time on the surface. Steam ships operating in the area often did not have an understanding of the length and depth of a surfaced submarine. […]

Read More 1928-1929 “Air getting very bad. Please hurry,” and finally, “Is there any hope?”