There are no routine days at sea on a submarine 4

Thresher

 

It was just another day at sea. Routine in many ways but in others it became an eternal reminder of the dangers associated with operating a submarine. The sea is unforgiving and the impact of any small failure becomes magnified beyond control within moments. I have sat in a chair, strapped in holding the yoke that controls the planes. I have stared at the numbers on the darkened panel a few feet in front of me as the numbers clicked off the change of depth. You can feel the pull of gravity as the boat descends deeper and faster with each passing moment. On another day on another boat, we were too heavy and the surface had just released it’s grip on us. Bow heavy, we were going deeper and deeper when we lost propulsion. The fairwater planes were jammed in a rise position and I pulled back as hard as I could on the stern planes to try and slow the dive. Test depth came and went. The boat creaked and men quietly prayed. “Conn, maneuvering, propulsion has been restored”. We slowly climbed back to a safer place between the ocean’s floor and the typhoon that still raged above us. I still have waking nightmares about that night. I clutch my pillow to my chest like it was the outboard yoke, straining with all of my might to will the boat back from the deep.

I often imagine what it was like on the 10th of April 1963 for the planesmen as Thresher made that last dive.
I salute my brothers still on eternal patrol.

Mister Mac

In memory of those we have lost

USS Pittsburgh SSN 720 Crew Visit to Pittsburgh April 6th 2016 Reply

Pittsburgh Pittsburgh_Pirates3
Greetings to all of my Pittsburgh PA area shipmates and friends.
The Captain and part of the crew of the USS Pittsburgh are arriving this Sunday evening for a official and non official visit to the city.
Wednesday afternoon and evening, there is a great way to honor the crew by attending a Meet and Greet Cash Bar Pre-game Party at the Atria in the PNC Complex at 4:30 P.M. followed by a Pirates Game at PNC Park.
Cost is $25.00 for the pre-game and $25.00 for the game.
This is a great opportunity to show support for our submarine and crew. Tickets are on a first come basis so please respond to John Caspero (Captain of the Pittsburgh Relief Crew) as soon as possible.
RSVP to John Caspero
email: jfcaspero@verizon.net
or email me at bobmac711@live.com for more details
Note: You do not need to be a Navy veteran or former submariner. This is just a great way to pay a small tribute to real American heroes and spend a few hours with them watching a great American sport and team.
I hope to see you there
Bob MacPherson
aka theleansubmariner

Cold War 2 – Russia Rising Reply

Headline:

Russian military plans buildup from West to Pacific

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia is to beef up its military forces all the way from its western border to the Pacific islands amid ongoing strains with the West, the military said Friday.

Perhaps Putin and his Comrades should remember the last time they tried to use coercive measures to blackmail the world into submission.

Here’s a little reminder:

#blackhullsmatter

 

Stand by for action, its going to heat up all over again.

Mister Mac

Local teen selected to represent the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps in Australia Reply

Pittsburgh Area Sea Cadet News

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Sea Cadet Chief Petty Officer Ian Sleigh is not your typical high school freshman. At barely 16, Chief Sleigh has already racked up a fairly impressive resume.  Starting at an early age he completed his first ship board training at age 11 in Buffalo, New York at the Buffalo Naval Park. Sleigh has also trained in Tactical Medicine, attended a Navy Submarine School, been to Petty Officer Leadership Academy and nearly a dozen other training evolutions in the past five years.
 
Sleigh was recently selected to participate in the Sea Cadet’s International Exchange Program in April. As of one of only two cadets selected, he will be heading to Australia in April to work alongside cadets from Canada, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, South Africa, and, of course, Australia. 
 
The program begins with a two day adventure camp at an Australian Naval Air Station which will include sailing, canoeing and shipboard/simulator activities.  Cadets will also visit the Darling Harbor Zoo, the Australian War Memorial and Sydney Maritime Museum as well as participating in the annual ANZAC Day parade.
 
The Pittsburgh Battalion Sea Cadet is currently the highest ranking cadet in the unit. He has over 40 cadets under his command. He was awarded the Navy League’s Theodore Roosevelt Youth Medal for outstanding Sea Cadet of the year for the Pittsburgh Battalion at the annual Navy League award dinner at the Pittsburgh Athletic Club on February 6th.
 
A student at Mars Area High School, in Mars, Pennsylvania the freshman is an active member of Mars Boy Scout Troop 400 where he currently is a Life Scout working on his Eagle Scout requirements. He is also an active member of the Big Red One Living History Organization where he helps teach the public about the life of soldiers during World War II.
 
The U.S. Naval Sea Cadets Corps (USNSCC) is a non-profit youth development program for youth age 11 through the completion of high school. Cadets participate in weekend drills with their local unit and may attend national training events during the winter and summer vacations. Training evolutions are conducted in more than 60 different Navy and STEM career fields. The Pittsburgh Battalion serves the Western Pennsylvania general area and has cadets from Ohio and West Virginia as well.  For more information on the Sea Cadet program please visit www.seacadets.org and for information about the Pittsburgh Battalion go to www.pittsburghseacadets.com.
 
Lcdr. Paul M. Julian, USNSCC

2016 Pittsburgh Regional Sea Perch Competition 1

The Navy League was on hand to recognize the winners of the 2016 Regional Sea Perch Competition held in Pittsburgh in February. Hopewell High School was the top High School Team and Harrison Middle school was the top Middle school team. Both received trophy’s and medals from various sponsors including the Navy League and both received invitations to the 2016 National SeaPerch Competition and need help to raise funds which will allow them to compete at the National Competition in Baton Rouge, LA.

Sea Perch is part of the ongoing mission to encourage our youth to pursue careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. This was a combined effort by the Navy City Outreach Northeast partnering with Penn State Center Pittsburgh and 4-H of Allegheny County and influential community leaders in Pittsburgh to make the SeaPerch program available to local schools.

SeaPerch is an innovative underwater robotics program that equips teachers and students with the resources they need to build an underwater Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) in an in-school or out-of-school setting. Students build the ROV from a kit comprised of low-cost, easily accessible parts, following a curriculum that teaches basic engineering and science concepts with a marine engineering theme. The SeaPerch Program provides students with the opportunity to learn about robotics, engineering, science, and mathematics (STEM) while building an underwater ROV as part of a science and engineering technology curriculum. Throughout the project, students learn engineering concepts, problem solving, teamwork, and technical applications. For more information, visit http://www.seaperch.org<http://www.seaperch.org/>.

The Pittsburgh Council of the United States Navy League (a 501C 3 organization) is supporting the fund raising effort by asking for you to send your donations through us to help them on their way. While the students are also working on local fundraisers, the costs for registration, travel and lodging will have to be met.

These funds will help to pay their transportation, food and lodging. We need your support as soon as possible but before April 15 2016

Individuals or corporations can assist in one of two ways:

  1. Contributing on line through the Go Fund Me web site: https://www.gofundme.com/4eqq9a9s
  2. Send a check made out to Pittsburgh Council U.S. Navy League (write Sea Perch Fund Support in the memo line) to:

Robert W. MacPherson, 3 Circle Drive, West Newton, PA 15089

We will be very grateful for your support. More important, this will help the program to grow for the future and encourage our area winners to pursue this unique opportunity.

Pittsburgh Battalion of the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps Reply

Greetings

I had a great meeting today (January 17, 2016) with the staff of the Pittsburgh Battallion of the Naval Sea Cadet Corps. This is a great organization sponsored in part by the Pittsburgh Council of the US Navy League. Because of recent changes in the security measures at their old location (Marine Reserve Building) they are seeking a new home in the Pittsburgh Metro Area. This program is a positive program for young people that supports leadership development, personal growth and service to the community.

The kids learn about inner discipline while they learn about first aid, search and rescue, real world problem solving skills in a setting that is both fun and challenging.

So the challenge will be to find a facility willing to host the group on its drill weekends (2 days a month) and training events for the combined units from Pittsburgh Erie and perhaps some of the local JROTC groups. Funds are limited since the money raised goes towards uniforms, materials and supporting kids with limited incomes. Looking for ideas … Thanks

Mister Mac, CWO2 USN Retired (AKA theleansubmariner)

 

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Deming’s 14 Points 2

Some great reading on Deming’s 14 Points. Certainly worth the read for a lean practitioner or someone just starting out in the lean world.

Systems Thinking and the Vanguard Method

W. Edwards Deming’s 14 points are the basis for transformation of industry. Adoption and action on the 14 points are a signal that the management intend to stay in business. aim to protect investors and jobs. Such a system formed the basis for lessons for top management in Japan in 1950 and in subsequent years.

The 14 points apply anywhere, to small organisations as well as to large ones, to the service industry as well as to manufacturing. They equally apply to any division within a company and to it’s suppliers.

As you read through each of the 14 points below, ask yourself if they still apply today, either within your current organisation, or within organisations you have recently worked for. The answers may be surprising.

1. Constancy of purpose:

Create constancy of purpose toward continual improvement of product and service, with a plan to become competitive and to stay…

View original post 2,657 more words

Submarine Construction Update Reply

I was sent an article today that is very important to those who follow naval ship construction. The author is Hugh Lessig, a writer for the Daily Press at  http://www.dailypress.com/

I am reprinting his article with permission.

New Generation of Submarines Is Biggest Question for Huntington Ingalls

Hugh Lessig, Daily Press, Dec 3

“The biggest question facing the nation’s largest military shipbuilder is how will Congress pay for the next generation of ballistic missile submarines, the head of Huntington Ingalls Industries said Thursday.

Aircraft carriers and amphibious warships aside, CEO Mike Petters said the funding strategy for replacing Ohio-class submarines is the number-one issue for the industry, not just the company.

“That could become our greatest opportunity and could also become our greatest risk, if it’s not done right,” Petters said at the Credit Suisse Industrials Conference in Florida.

The Navy plans to replace its aging Ohio-class submarines with a new 12-boat fleet. It wants to purchase the first submarine in 2021. By 2026, it will buy one each year.

But the new subs come with a significant price tag, so Congress created a special fund to pay for them. The National Sea-Based Deterrence Fund is separate from the Navy’s annual shipbuilding budget, and two lawmakers are credited with pushing it: Rep. Randy Forbes, R-Chesapeake, and Rep. Joe Courtney, D-Conn.

They are major advocates for the only two U.S. shipyards that build nuclear-powered submarines: HII’s Newport News Shipbuilding and General Dynamics Electric Boat of Groton, Conn.

Some questioned whether a submarine program should be funded outside the Navy budget. Supporters say the nuclear-missile-armed subs are a national asset because they constitutes the undersea portion of the U.S. nuclear deterrent.

Newport News and Electric Boat are expected to share the work of building the Ohio-class replacement boats, although those details haven’t been worked out. Electric Boat recently cut the ribbon on a new facility in Quonset Point, R.I., to build components for the new subs. The company has added 600 workers in the past year, according to Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I.

If Congress uses the deterrence fund like a savings account, socking away money for big bills coming due in the 2020s, the military shipbuilding base can stay healthy, Petters said. If it has to find the money for the subs in its annual shipbuilding budget, that could spell trouble.

At a Forbes-chaired hearing earlier this week, Eric J. Labs, a Congressional Budget Office senior analyst, laid out the sobering math in the Navy’s 30-year shipbuilding plan.

The 2016 plan calls for buying 264 ships at $494 billion over three decades, according to the Navy’s numbers. CBO estimates those same ships would cost $552 billion — and the price is higher when mid-life aircraft carrier refuelings and other work is included.

In other words, if the shipbuilding budget remains static, “the service would not be able to afford its 2016 plan,” Labs said.

He also looked at how the Ohio-class replacement boats impact the 30-year plan.

The first Ohio-class replacement sub is estimated to cost $12.1 billion, including initial research, development and engineering, the Navy says. Boats that follow will cost about $5.7 billion on average. CBO’s estimates are even higher: $13.2 billion for the first in class and $6.8 billion for the 2nd through 12th ships.

Bottom line: With a static shipbuilding budget and a big-ticket submarine fleet, the Navy would end up buying 192 ships over 30 years, not its stated goal of 264, Labs said.

That’s a big concern for HII, which builds destroyers and amphibious warships at its Ingalls Shipbuilding division in Pascagoula, Miss. Those ship programs are more likely to be affected than the aircraft carrier program at Newport News, because the law requires an 11-carrier fleet. There is no such protection for other surface combat ships.

“If the decision is, we’re going to pay for (the new submarines) out of normal shipbuilding accounts, then many, many programs will be impacted over a long period of time,” said Petters. “That will have a tremendously negative impact to the entire shipbuilding industrial base.”

One thing is clear: The new submarines will be built.

“This is a national priority, and it will happen,” Petters said. “It’s a question of, will it crowd out anything else?””

Mister Mac

More…

If you want a Safe Space, here’s a thought Reply

SUBSAFE is a quality assurance program of the United States Navy designed to maintain the safety of the nuclear submarine fleet; specifically, to provide maximum reasonable assurance that subs’ hulls will stay watertight, and that they can recover from unanticipated flooding.

SUBSAFE covers all systems exposed to sea pressure or critical to flooding recovery. All work done and all materials used on those systems are tightly controlled to ensure the material used in their assembly as well as the methods of assembly, maintenance, and testing are correct. They require certification with traceable quality evidence. These measures increase the cost of submarine construction and maintenance.

SUBSAFE addresses only flooding; mission assurance is not a concern, simply a side benefit. Other safety programs and organizations regulate such things as fire safety, weapons systems safety, and nuclear reactor systems safety.

From 1915 to 1963, the United States Navy lost 16 submarines to non-combat related causes. Since SUBSAFE began in 1963, only one submarine, the non-SUBSAFE-certified USS Scorpion (SSN-589), has been lost.

History

On 10 April 1963, while on a deep test dive about 200 miles off the northeast coast of the United States, USS Thresher (SSN-593) was lost with all hands. The loss of the lead ship of a new, fast, quiet, deep-diving class of submarines led the Navy to re-evaluate the methods used to build its submarines. A “Thresher Design Appraisal Board” determined that, although the basic design of the Thresher class was sound, measures should be taken to improve the condition of the hull and the ability of submarines to control and recover from flooding casualties.

SUBSAFE certification is carried out in four areas; Design, Material, Fabrication, & Testing. The exact procedures are documented in the initial design & construction for new submarines, while undergoing routine maintenance in naval depots, and in the fleet maintenance manual for operating submarines. During each step, quality evidence is collected, reviewed, approved, and stored for the life of the submarine. This process is reinforced with external and internal audits.

ous Sub safe space